TWO news stories caught my attention last month because they involved two of my favorite funny Cebuanos, Esteban Escudero, who is Provincial Board Member Julian Daan when he tries to be serious, and Max Surban. Of course we know Max Surban. He popularized the song “Billionaire” written by Bruno Mars.
Last May 16, a man barged into Teban’s house in Talisay City, held him up at knifepoint and ran off with P1 million worth of jewelry, the news said. Teban was working on an episode for his regular drama show when the robber demanded money from our funny man. Teban only had P300 in his pocket and the vintage manual typewriter in front of him, so he led the robber to the master bedroom where the jewelry was kept.
The news said that at first Teban thought a prank was being played on him. We can imagine him telling the robber, “Dong, wa man ni labot sa eksena, HAHAHA.” (In English: Dude, this is not part of the scene, LOL.) But that moment, Bisaya humor seemed to fail, even if the robber was arrested the next day.
Few days later, novelty music icon Max Surban made it to Page 10 when he sued his long-time record label over unpaid royalties. He filed the complaint against Bayanihan Music Inc., accusing the music label of duping him into assigning to the company the rights to ten of his popular songs for only P1 back in the 1980s. He demanded close to P1 million in damages and litigation expenses.
The case is pending, so we will not discuss it here. There’s this legal term called sub-judice, which is Latin for “don’t discuss it here or the court will whop you with more Latin words.”
I grew up listening to Teban’s radio shows and Surban’s songs. From them I learned that the Cebuano language can be a powerful creative tool to make people laugh and forget about their wives, I mean, worries.
I was reminded of Teban and Surban and Bisaya humor while tweeting last week. I keep a Twitter account to amuse myself at how people behave online in 140 characters. How to make a fool or a philosopher of yourself in such limited space is the challenge that makes Twitter popular.
What I didn’t expect to see in Twitter is Bisaya humor kept alive by a group of young people with Esteban Escudero and a Max Surban in their blood. I’m referring to the Twitter account “Sinugbang Sugbo.” Instead of tweeting about how boring their day was and how life is empty without the Azkals, blah blah blah, the group makes fun of just about anything they think is worth making fun of, in 140 characters, and in Bisaya.
And Bisaya tweeters appreciated the fun. In less than a week, Sinugbang Sugbo attracted 80 “followers,” actually a speck of dust in a network of millions of stalkers. But if you’re familiar with Twitter, you have to be Lady the Gaga or Justin the Bieber to attract followers without trying.
The account employs dialogue as device, between a boy named Gorio and his mother, simply known as Mama, in poking fun at pop culture.
Take this on Manny Pacquiao:
Mama: Dong Gorio, datoa na anang Dionesia no? Unsa ra tawn na sila sa una. Gorio: Unya? Mama: Aw, wa man, naa ra gyud na nimo kung mag-boxer ka.
Some English lines made it into the posts, but always with a distinct Cebuano taste to it:
Gorio: Unsay sud-an ma? Mama: Fish with vinegar, salt, seasoning, bell pepper, bulb onions, garlic cloves and ginger. Gorio: Unsa na? Mama: Inun-unan.
Just check them out for a good Bisaya laugh at Twitter.com/Sinugbang Sugbo. I seriously doubt if Teban and Surban are not behind this account.
MONKEY11

TWO news stories caught my attention last month because they involved two of my favorite funny Cebuanos, Esteban Escudero, who is Provincial Board Member Julian Daan when he tries to be serious, and Max Surban. Of course we know Max Surban. He popularized the song “Billionaire” written by Bruno Mars.

Last May 16, a man barged into Teban’s house in Talisay City, held him up at knifepoint and ran off with P1 million worth of jewelry, the news said. Teban was working on an episode for his regular drama show when the robber demanded money from our funny man. Teban only had P300 in his pocket and the vintage manual typewriter in front of him, so he led the robber to the master bedroom where the jewelry was kept.

The news said that at first Teban thought a prank was being played on him. We can imagine him telling the robber, “Dong, wa man ni labot sa eksena, HAHAHA.” (In English: Dude, this is not part of the scene, LOL.) But that moment, Bisaya humor seemed to fail, even if the robber was arrested the next day.

Few days later, novelty music icon Max Surban made it to Page 10 when he sued his long-time record label over unpaid royalties. He filed the complaint against Bayanihan Music Inc., accusing the music label of duping him into assigning to the company the rights to ten of his popular songs for only P1 back in the 1980s. He demanded close to P1 million in damages and litigation expenses.

The case is pending, so we will not discuss it here. There’s this legal term called sub-judice, which is Latin for “don’t discuss it here or the court will whop you with more Latin words.”

I grew up listening to Teban’s radio shows and Surban’s songs. From them I learned that the Cebuano language can be a powerful creative tool to make people laugh and forget about their wives, I mean, worries.

I was reminded of Teban and Surban and Bisaya humor while tweeting last week. I keep a Twitter account to amuse myself at how people behave online in 140 characters. How to make a fool or a philosopher of yourself in such limited space is the challenge that makes Twitter popular.

What I didn’t expect to see in Twitter is Bisaya humor kept alive by a group of young people with Esteban Escudero and Max Surban in their blood. I’m referring to the Twitter account “Sinugbang Sugbo.” Instead of tweeting about how boring their day was and how life is empty without the Azkals, blah blah blah, the group makes fun of just about anything they think is worth making fun of, in 140 characters, and in Bisaya.

And Bisaya tweeters appreciate the fun. In less than a week, Sinugbang Sugbo attracted 80 “followers,” actually a speck of dust in a network of millions of stalkers. But if you’re familiar with Twitter, you have to be Lady the Gaga or Justin the Bieber to attract followers without trying.

The account employs dialogue as device, between a boy named Gorio and his mother, simply known as Mama, in poking fun at pop culture.

Take this on Manny Pacquiao:

Mama: Dong Gorio, datoa na anang Dionesia no? Unsa ra tawn na sila sa una. Gorio: Unya? Mama: Aw, wa man, naa ra gyud na nimo kung mag-boxer ka.

Some English lines made it into the posts, but always with a distinct Cebuano taste to it:

Gorio: Unsay sud-an ma? Mama: Fish with vinegar, salt, seasoning, bell pepper, bulb onions, garlic cloves and ginger. Gorio: Unsa na? Mama: Inun-unan.

Just check them out for a good Bisaya laugh at Twitter.com/Sinugbang Sugbo. I seriously doubt if Teban and Surban are not behind this account.

(SUN.STAR CEBU, JUNE 7, 2011)